Layton F.E.S.T. celebrates food, entertainment, harvest
Patrons enjoy Layton F.E.S.T. at Layton Commons Park on July 15; the event runs Fridays through Sept. 30 and features produce, food trucks, entertainment and more.
Photo supplied/Joy Petro

Layton F.E.S.T. celebrates food, entertainment, harvest

LAYTON — Hundreds of hungry people are converging at Layton Commons Park on Friday nights for Layton City’s second annual season of Layton F.E.S.T., which stands for farmers, entertainment, shopping and trucks — as in food trucks.

The food trucks are in abundance — six or seven each week—– along with treats like funnel cakes, cotton candy and lemonade stands. The event also includes vendors with fresh produce and some homemade wares like candles, oils and handbags.

As people shop and eat, each week also features different entertainment, said Joy Petro, Layton City councilwoman.

“We really started it to help the local farmers and hobbyists,” Petro said. “We wanted to give them a place to sell their produce and let your residents have the chance to get fresh, garden food.”

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She said the other elements were then added in and have been very successful.

Brooke Williams came to the fest for the first time on opening night, July 15.

“I’ve always gone to the Taste of the Town but this seems pretty cool,” she said as she loaded her kids in their stroller. The Clearfield resident said she enjoys eating from food trucks; “Wherever Waffle Wagon is, I’m here,” she said.


 PREVIEW

• WHAT: Layton F.E.S.T.

• WHEN: 5:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Fridays through Sept. 30

• WHERE: Layton Commons Park, 437 N. Wasatch Drive, Layton

• ADMISSION: Free; food, produce and vendor items available for purchase


Kaysville resident Darlene Howe decided to come to the event with her husband after reading about it in the newspaper.

“I haven’t tried the food trucks and wanted to check it out,” she said.

Howe said she paid about $10 for eight chicken wings, which she felt was a good deal. “It’s better than cooking dinner,” she said.

Howe, who said she also liked the fact that parking wasn’t an issue, was waiting for a band to perform and enjoyed the people-watching as well. 

Andrew Rigby, a part owner of Waffle Wagon and Fiiz food trucks, said he was happy to be included in the mix of food trucks.

“It’s been really busy. It’s a good showing,” said Rigby, a member of the Wasatch Front Eats food truck alliance, at the July 15 opening event.

Petro said in addition to the food options, there will also be a different theme of entertainment each week that will be free. Friday, July 22, is art night with a huge canvas set up for people to express themselves artistically. There will also be sidewalk chalk on hand for folks to make chalk art creations.

Dance recitals will be featured July 29, with several dance groups performing.

Other weekly events include an Olympic night with game stations, high school spirit nights with the area high schools and bands, a special pet night with dog performances and acts, and various local band performances.

“It’s just a fun way to bring everyone together and let people know that not everything has to be at a high price,” Petro said.

Petro said things have run more smoothly with Layton F.E.S.T. this year because organizers outsourced the food trucks to a team of trucks.

“Now we can focus on the events and vendors,” she said.

Petro added she would like to see more farmers bringing in their produce; “We hope that it helps with the nutrition in the city,” she said.

She encourages produce vendors to call 801-336-3900 or check the event’s website to sign up.